How to Find Your Passion

Roll up your sleeves, and do a little detective work on yourself!

But don’t be afraid to do this. Actually, you probably already know what things you are passionate about, but this knowledge is hidden somewhere inside your mind. That’s where the detective work comes in, because it’s up to you to find what you’re passionate about and bring it out in the daylight so you can observe it better and see it from all angles.

Just a small tip: if you’re going to try this, then don’t forget to have some fun with it. It’s a creative endeavor. So use your imagination, try out different options, and observe carefully how you react to each one.

Here are 5 ideas to help you identify what you’re passionate about.

Idea #1. Befriend your inner child.

Just because you are now grown up (or if you’re like me, you openly say you’re never going to be one hundred percent grown-up anyway!), that does not mean you should ignore the child you once were and that is still in you. Let’s say you’re a college student, or you’re working on your career, or you’re a parent or an entrepreneur. It doesn’t matter what stage of life you’re currently in, because when it comes to passion, age is irrelevant. That’s why it will benefit you greatly if you acknowledge that your inner child is still there, and ask what it wants to be when it grows up.

Here’s how.

  • Write down at least 5 things your inner child tells you it want to become when it grows up. Take an hour or two for this exercise to really think it through. Don’t limit yourself. Your answers can be as short or as long as you want them to be. The key is in writing it all down.
  • Look over your list, and pick items that still speak to you that you may have forgotten. One, five, or ten years ago, did you have big plans to be a writer, a teacher, a painter, or an athlete? When was the last time you did any of those things? How did you feel when you were doing them? Write this down too.
  • Make a plan to try something out. Specifically, make a plan for the following month to devote some time (for example, 1 hour in the evening, or twice a week if your schedule is full) to do one of the items you’ve selected from the list. If you chose painting, for example, go buy a sketch pad and some watercolors and start with a basic drawing of an object you like or a favorite animal. Or, if you picked a sport you were really into and still like to practice, make the time to go to your local gym and start working out more seriously.

Idea #2. Do something that really makes you feel good.

As a grown-up, it’s quite normal to feel that your life in adulthood is not at all what you once thought it would be. Do you feel like you now only have time for work but not for play? If so, you’re not alone—this is something we all feel from time to time. But there are things you can do to make a change and improve your life for the better. For example, you can create a ritual to follow every day that will give you pleasure.

Here’s how.

  • If you’re an avid reader, make the time to go to the library to pick a novel and read it for 30 minutes each evening before going to sleep.
  • If you love music, learn how to play guitar or drums or the harmonica when you’ve finished with your work or school assignments.
  • If you enjoy writing, make it a priority to write one page in your journal either early in the morning or late at night when you have the time to organize your thoughts over a cup of tea.

Idea #3. Make some space to let happiness into your life.

Here’s another area that goes along with becoming an adult. As we accumulate more responsibilities and our lives get busier and busier, we forget to focus on what’s important. Instead, we often find ourselves getting distracted by obstacles we see in front of us. And as we switch our focus to those obstacles, we become more critical of ourselves, we’re impatient when we don’t perform well, and we get judgmental in evaluating our skills, achievements, even our intelligence. All it takes is to make a couple of small changes to see a difference.

Here’s how.

  • Change your attitude towards yourself by practicing self-compassion. Forgive yourself for mistakes that you made in the past. They’ve already happened, and you can’t go back in time. You can learn from them, but don’t hold on to them. This applies to your relationships, your career, your education, and other areas of your life in which you feel you have underperformed.
  • Actively look for what you can do to become happier. One of Harvard University’s top lecturers, Tal Ben-Shahar, wrote a book called Happier: Learn the Secrets to Daily Joy and Lasting Happiness. He focuses on positive psychology and how to apply the concept of happiness to daily life, for example in school, the workplace, and in our personal relationships.
  • Allow yourself some time to daydream. Not every minute of the day needs to be scheduled for work, study, personal, or professional responsibilities. Allow yourself to stare out the train window on your daily commute and watch the world go by. Go for a walk without a specific agenda, other than to let yourself be by yourself. Sit somewhere with your headphones and listen to music that brings you peace or gives you energy.

Idea #4. Identify a personal goal you can aspire to.

As you’re working hard to study for a college degree or to build a career, it’s important that you don’t neglect your personal development. Start by asking yourself some tough questions. For example: where do you want to be 5 or 10 years from now? Who do you want to become? What is your ideal scenario—perhaps living in a different city or country, having a partner to share your life journey with, being surrounded by smart and interesting people who contribute to your personal growth, or mastering jiujitsu? Get specific, be honest with yourself, then follow up with some action.

Here’s how.

  • Write down your top 3 personal goals. If you want to make sure you have enough time to focus on this activity, then set aside an hour or two this weekend to get serious about it.
  • Under each goal, write 3 things you would need to do consistently to get results. Want to get fit? Your three things could be to educate yourself on what types of food are healthier and can give you energy, set a schedule to work out 4 times a week, and start going to bed early.
  • Create a schedule for the week ahead. Nothing will actually get done unless you plan for it. Consistency is key, so you need to devote blocks of time ( starting with 30 minutes, for example) to make progress in the areas you’ve identified.
  • Do an assessment of the progress you made. A good idea is to review your efforts at the end of the week. Ask yourself, did some activities take more time than you anticipated? Why did they take as long? What could you have done better? Then make adjustments for the following week.

Idea #5. Fuel your motivation by jumpstarting your mornings.

To give yourself some extra time to pursue the things you’ve identified as your passions, you can consider mornings. Why? Because creating a morning routine can set the tone to your entire day, and give you a positive mindset to keep making progress on the things you feel passionate about.

Here’s how.

  • Start waking up just 15 minutes earlier. If you usually wake up at 7 a.m., set your morning alarm to 6:45. Keep this schedule for one week. The next week, set it again to 15 minutes earlier, this time for 6:30 a.m. Gradually increase the increments until you reach one hour. The benefit? You won’t feel the big change, and you’re more likely to keep the habit. An hour of free time for yourself is priceless!
  • Eat some brain food. Start the day with breakfast that will fill you up, give you energy, and improve cognitive function. Here are 3 breakfast ideas. Oatmeal mixed with peanut butter and fresh fruit, a parfait made with Greek yogurt and topped with granola and fruit, or eggs—they’re a powerful mix of B vitamins, antioxidants, and omega-3 fatty acids keep your nerve cells functioning at optimal speed.
  • Do a short burst of exercise. Pick a fast, easy to follow, and targeted workout to help your body wake up and prepare for the day ahead. Here are some ideas for a 10–15 minute wake-up session: a morning yoga routine, a set of sun salutation poses, or a quick set of sprints in your neighborhood to allow your mind and body to stay on the right track and keep doing what you enjoy!

 

Here’s how.

  • Start waking up just 15 minutes earlier. If you usually wake up at 7 a.m., set your morning alarm to 6:45. Keep this schedule for one week. The next week, set it again to 15 minutes earlier, this time for 6:30 a.m. Gradually increase the increments until you reach one hour. The benefit? You won’t feel the big change, and you’re more likely to keep the habit. An hour of free time for yourself is priceless!
  • Eat some brain food. Start the day with breakfast that will fill you up, give you energy, and improve cognitive function. Here are 3 breakfast ideas. Oatmeal mixed with peanut butter and fresh fruit, a parfait made with Greek yogurt and topped with granola and fruit, or eggs—they’re a powerful mix of B vitamins, antioxidants, and omega-3 fatty acids keep your nerve cells functioning at optimal speed.
  • Do a short burst of exercise. Pick a fast, easy to follow, and targeted workout to help your body wake up and prepare for the day ahead. Here are some ideas for a 10–15 minute wake-up session: a morning yoga routine, a set of sun salutation poses, or a quick set of sprints in your neighborhood to allow your mind and body to stay on the right track and keep doing what you enjoy!

 

Check out my ebook for more great ideas 🙂

10x Your Life

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